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Repurpose Your Career | Career Pivot | Careers for the 2nd Half of Life | Career Change | Baby Boomer

Repurpose Your Career podcast brought to you by Career Pivot is a podcast for those of us in the 2nd half of life to come together to discuss how repurpose our careers for the 21st century.  Come listen to career experts give you proven strategies, listen to people like you tell their stories about how they repurposed their careers and finally get your questions answered.   Your host, Marc Miller, has made six career pivots over the last 30 years. He understands this is not about jumping out of the frying pan into a fire but rather to create a plan where you make clear actionable steps or pivots to a better future career. 
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Now displaying: July, 2017
Jul 31, 2017

Steve Preston is Marc’s expert guest in this episode. Recognized as The Career Catalyst, Steve has transformed the lives and careers of thousands of people. Following a successful management career, Steve turned the opportunity of ‘redundancy’ (British for layoff), into a springboard, to achieve a very different working life. By exercising choice, Steve has become what he calls the architect of his own future, pursuing a successful portfolio career. Now, an internationally acclaimed author, speaker, and leading career coach, Steve is passionate about helping unlock and fulfill people’s potential. He especially enjoys helping people change their working lifestyle and develop portfolio careers to work for passion, pleasure, and profit.

 

Marc and Steve start the discussion with an introduction to Steve and his passions. Steve’s foremost passion is making a difference for others. He defines the portfolio career, what it is good for, and who it suits best. He talks about choice and flexibility. He shares examples of portfolio careerists from his book, Portfolio Career: How to Work for Passion, Pleasure, & Profit. Finally, he explains some of the aspects that people have who are attracted to a portfolio career.

 

Listen in to learn about working for passion, pleasure & profit, with multiple earnings streams.

Key Takeaways:

[3:22] Steve introduces himself and his passions. He is a family man, empty nester, world traveler, tennis player, music-lover, and guitar player. He loves craft beer, and is especially passionate about making a difference to the lives of others.

[6:38] A portfolio career derives income from a number of different sources. It’s a different mindset from having a one-income job, or a self-employed career doing one type of work. It uses any combination of activity, interests, skills, talents, and passions to create the working lifestyle you want, working for passion, pleasure and profit.

[7:44] In Marc’s online community, the one thing everyone wants is freedom. Steve shares a couple of examples of people of people from a recent visit to the U.S. Many people have portfolio careers without knowing what one is, exactly. Steve features many samples in his book. Freedom is what most of them enjoy.

[11:29] Steve clears up some myths about portfolio careers. Two widely-held conflicting concepts are: you never make money from your passion, vs., if you do what you love, the money will automatically follow. It all depends on your stage of life, and what the passion is. You might just be focused on earning enough. Take positive action.

[14:23] A portfolio career does not make you Jack of all trades and master of none. Steve offers examples of Jacks of all trades, and masters of many. In general, those with portfolio careers are very good at what they enjoy, or why do it?

[15:27] Some people who are transitioning ask, How do you expect me to get multiple jobs, when I’m struggling to get one? A full-time job is not the point of a portfolio career. You want income from multiple strands of activities. There can be a mixture of employed and self-employed.

[16:40] There is not any one type of person who wants a portfolio careers. There are examples from around the world in Steven’s book. But they have in common that they are open to challenging the way they work and earn, and challenging the conventional job mindset. They mix and match their ways to earn. They want choice. 

[19:08] Steven shares stories from the book. One came from a Turkish family farming background, and worked in the corporate world for while, but now earns multiple income streams in multiple currencies, as an internet entrepreneur. He also is involved in cryptocurrency. He failed his way forward. It has taken him 10 years to succeed.

[21:58] Another example was in local government, and laid off in his fifties. He unleashed his latent creativity. He now works with neurolinguistic programming, writing, blogging, and copy editing. He copy edited Steven’s books. He creates presentations.

[23:33] A lot of the examples are like Marc’s clients, who fit into the corporate world, until they couldn’t take it any longer. Steven shares another example, of a lady who daydreamed her way out of a corporate job, into becoming a digital nomad in Malaysia. It’s essential to have a support group, spouse, or fan club to pick you up when you fall.

[25:53] Key aspects to a portfolio career: mindset, resilience, and finding your anchor. One thing that will cover most of your earnings. Then you build up other streams besides that. If you get overloaded, then prioritize, and collaborate with other people.

[28:19] Self Marketing is fundamental. LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, and so on are integral to your brand. Say the right things about yourself that will interest the right people. Steven’s book lists the top ten aspects that make the difference for portfolio careerists.

[30:22] Marc’s final words: Marc would like you to pick up Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide to the Second half of Life, at Amazon or other online retailers. When you complete reading the book, Marc would appreciate an honest review on Amazon.com. Marc is working on a CareerPivot.com membership community.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Careerpivot.com/episode-39

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for the Second Half of Life, by Marc Miller and Susan Lahey (Now available online)

Contact Marc, and ask questions at: Careerpivot.com/contact-me

Call Marc at 512-693-9132 and leave a message and email address.

Portfolio Careers: How to Work for Passion, Pleasure & Profit, by Steve Preston

StevePrestonTheCareerCatalyst.com

Amazon.com/Steve-Preston

Twitter: @SteveMPreston

LinkedIn: Steve Preston

Please take a moment — go to iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play. Give this podcast a review and subscribe! If you’re not sure how to leave a review, please go to CareerPivot.com/review, and read the detailed instructions there.

 

Jul 24, 2017

In this episode, Marc answers questions with his trusty sidekick, Elizabeth Rabaey. You can learn about her career pivots in Episode 020. Listen in to this episode for ideas on planning a path to the end goal, harvesting contacts in similar and adjacent industries, coping with stress before searching for a job, and pivoting to a new industry using your core value proposition!

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:44] Elizabeth introduces herself. After pivoting, she is the marketing coordinator for an international company. Elizabeth invites listeners to connect with her on LinkedIn to share experiences. She enjoys working with Marc, and helping on the Mailbag episode!

[3:27] Q1: I am 49 and am going through a divorce. I’ve been a housewife since 1992. I’m going to college for an MBA. I have eight years ahead of me. I am hoping to support myself by a job in Hawaii after I get my MBA. I will have no debt. Any ideas what to do?

[4:06] A1: Marc notes she will be in her late 50s, with no experience, after getting her bachelor's and master’s degrees. Rather than looking at an MBA, she should look at her actual goal. Marc connected her with contacts in Hawaii, to understand that economy. Marc suggests buying a franchise or business, learning trade skills, or something else.

[6:49] Marc says many of the best jobs today didn’t exist five years ago. What will exist in eight years? Divorce later in life often leads to poverty. This client doesn’t want to leave Hawaii. Marc put her in touch with a Hawaiian workforce specialist to help her.

[7:33] Q2: I am a 56-year-old account manager. I was just laid off from a position that I held for 18 years in the moving industry. I’m getting depressed, as I have been unsuccessful in my job search. I have been applying to jobs every day, but never hear back. What should I do?

[7:51] A2: Account managers are becoming rare in B2B sales. The need for account managers has been greatly decreased. Marc helped someone very similar to this. See the :Introverted Sales Guy Job Search” blog on Marc’s website. The key piece is, your next job will only come from somebody you’ve worked with over the last 10-15 years.

[8:43] You’re going to have to go back and carefully harvest all of your contacts, people you have worked with, reach out to them where they work now, and see if they are willing to help. The answer is most account managers are really nice guys. Usually they’re very good at relationships. Very often people will remember them positively.

[9:25] As Marc did with the Account Manager who came out of the equipment manufacturing business, he had the client very carefully go on LinkedIn to find his previous employer’s page, look for similar companies, and adjacent industries, who need the same skills, and look for weak ties at those companies.

[10:27] This is a long process. Look for connections everyday. You don’t know when you will find the right contact who can help you, who has a job, in an industry where you fit. Start taking really good care of yourself, eating right, exercising, and getting up at the same time, and managing your own health. Your mental attitude is absolutely critical.

[11:26] Q3: I am a 52-year-old traffic manager. My job has gotten toxic after I was transferred and I uncovered fraud. I cleaned up the mess, but it has taken quite a toll on me emotionally, and after everything was cleaned up, the owner brought in someone over me who has ethical flaws. I have been looking for a year. What should I do?

[11:57] A3: This is a family-owned business. The challenge with working for a family owned business, not being family, is that it can get ugly. He’s an emotional guy. When he was getting rid of people, and getting his tires slashed, it really took a toll on him. If you’re stressed out, no one is going to hire you. First, chill out.

[13:14] In this situation, he will need to stop caring about doing a great job. He needs to work on his own emotional health, and get rid of stress. Marc suggests the book Positive Intelligence to get out of stress. The point is to stay in the positive mind three times longer than in the negative mind. Find your emotional saboteurs. Name them.

[15:20] Then you need to find your core value proposition. This gentleman’s core value proposition was recruiting drivers. We don’t have enough drivers in this country. Build a brand that sells your core value proposition, in your LinkedIn profile, your resume, and more importantly, when you talk to people. That is your primary selling point.

[16:04] He needs to look at himself as a product, understand what his core value proposition is, and and go sell that ‘product.’ He’s getting offers that are not local, but his wife has a good job, and he doesn’t want to move. He can move into a different niche, because his recruiting skill is transferable. He should think of himself as a consultant.

[17:57] When Marc left corporate America, he was completely stressed out. It took him six-to-nine months to destress, before he was useful again.

[19:30] Marc has started recording the audio version of his book. He is also working on the Career Pivot Community website. This will be a membership area of the current CareerPivot.com website. An initial cohort of members is helping develop the content. Look for more on this, in the coming months.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Please pick up a copy of Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for the 2nd Half of Life, by Marc Miller and Susan Lahey. When you get done reading the book, please leave an honest review on Amazon.

Careerpivot.com
Contact Marc, and ask questions at: Careerpivot.com/contact-me

Episode 020 Elizabeth Rabaey

Elizabeth Rabaey on LinkedIn

CareerPivot.com Introverted Sales Guy Job Search

Positive Intelligence: Why Only 20% of Teams and Individuals Achieve Their True Potential AND HOW YOU CAN ACHIEVE YOURS, by Shirzad Chamine

CareerPivot.com Episode-38

Take a moment — go to iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play. Please give this podcast a review and subscribe! If you’re not sure how to leave a review, please go to CareerPivot.com/review, and read the detailed instructions there.

Jul 17, 2017

In this episode, Marc reads the first two chapters of his new audio book. The topics are vetting the company, and answering the dreaded question, why do you want to leave your current position? Marc uses case studies and examples to explain the purpose of these important themes. Listen in to learn how to make sure the company you target is really the company where you want to work.

 

Key Takeaways:

[2:33] “Vetting the Company.” A client told Marc about interviewing for a new startup. After getting to the final interview, she lost. The employee that was hired was fired in six weeks. The company came back to this client, and she declined.

[3:05] Before approaching a company about a job, do your due diligence. Research the company on sites like Glassdoor.com. Go to the hiring manager’s profile on LinkedIn and check their recommendation section. Have they given recommendations to their employees? Have their employees recommended their manager?

[3:47] Connect with recruiters or HR Professionals at the target company on LInkedIn. This will give you visibility at the target company. Ask your connections for connections at the target company. Former employees may give information what it’s like to work there. Find out what current and former employees think of the hiring manager.

[5:03] Prepare for the interview. An interview is like a first date. It’s not all about whether the other person likes you. What do you like or not like about the company? Be ready with your elevator pitch about what you need.

[5:18] The interview isn’t just about whether you get the job, but whether you want it. Marc gives a case study from a hiring manager. Have written questions to ask, and write the answers on the paper. Use controlled pauses. Restate the question you were asked.

[6:09] Marc gives examples of questions you should ask, and scenarios you may encounter. If the hiring manager balks at your questions, you might want to dig deeper.

[7:36] You may watch body language to get an accurate reading of the situation. With the information you have received from current and former employees, you should be able to ‘play detective.’ Pay attention to your gut instincts.

[8:06] Action steps. Check out the company before the interview. Look on sites like Glassdoor.com. Talk to people who work for the company, and former employees.Look at recommendations on LinkedIn. Prepare a list of 10 questions you want answered.

[8:37] For additional sources, check out CareerPivot.com/ryc-resources.

[8:46] “The Dreaded Question.” It is all but guaranteed you will be asked the following question: “Why do you want to leave your current company?” They may harp on this, to see if you have anger about your company. Your response should pivot the conversation from what you are leaving to where you are going. Do not get negative.

[9:55] When you need more love and more money. Marc uses the example of Robert, a lecturer at a major midwest university, and gives sample questions to use, to pivot from a negative theme to a positive response. Use the questions as a way to pose a question back at the interviewer. Practice doing this with your own questions and answers.

[12:03] When you need more status and freedom. Marc uses the example of James, and gives ways that James could pivot the conversation where he wants it to go, when asked why he wants to leave his current position.

[14:15] When you need to be in charge of the process. Marc uses the example of Mary, who works in marketing for a large company. Marc gives sample answers Mary could provide to the question, why she wants to leave her current position.

[16:59] Action steps: Formulate a positive response to the question why you want to leave your current position. Practice answering uncomfortable questions by asking the interviewer a difficult questions. Avoid saying anything that looks, smells, or sounds the least bit negative.

[16:20] These two chapters were only updated slightly, and are still relevant. Pick up a copy of the book, and please write an honest review on Amazon.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

CareerPivot.com/blog

Marc@CareerPivot.com

Contact Marc, and ask questions at: Careerpivot.com/contact-me. Marc is accepting new clients, so reach out to him. He will supply a link to his calendar to set up a call.

Please pick up a copy of Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for the 2nd Half of Life, by Marc Miller and Susan Lahey. When you get done reading the book, please leave a review on Amazon.

CareerPivot.com/ryc-resources (Repurpose Your Career Resources)

CareerPivot.com/episode-37

Please take a moment — go to iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play. Give this podcast a review and subscribe! If you’re not sure how to leave a review, please go to CareerPivot.com/review, and read the detailed instructions there.

Jul 10, 2017

Marc introduces the common themes of the eight career changes or pivots recapped in this episode. First, they had an idea, and did not act on it. Second, there was a moment or event that vaulted them into action. Third, no matter how well they planned it, things did not turn out as planned, and they needed to adapt as they went along. Marc reviews some of their stories, with clips characterizing the three phases in common. He shares some guest clips for each of the three phases.

Listen in for a variety of experiences and tips for pivoting to, or changing, careers.

 

Key Takeaways:

[3:08] Marc interviewed Dr. Joel Dobbs in Episode 3. Dr. Dobbs was an accomplished pharmaceutical executive. Now he has a portfolio career that includes consulting, teaching, and coaching. He planned this out well. Dr. Dobson noted that his life was half gone, and he was inspired by the book Halftime, to do something different.

[5:28] Dr. Dobson took a pause to reflect, and sought things that would lead to a new life of significance, to give back. He thought about doing something very different.

[7:26] Marc interviewed Mike O’Krent in Episode 7. Mike went from a carpet store to chronicling people’s lives in video interviews with Life Stories Alive. Mike tells how he started chronicling Holocaust survivors’ stories for the Jewish Federation of San Antonio — for one project ending in 2000. When it was over, he went back to his carpet sales.

[10:02] Marc interviewed Jennifer Winter in Episode 28. Jennifer was VP of Sports Sponsorship for Turner Broadcasting, and hated it. Everyone told her how great her job was, so she stayed 21 years. Impending layoffs started her thinking about a change.

[14:12] Marc introduces the next phase, vaulting into action, with more from Mike O’Krent. Mike’s business coach had him write a list of items he both enjoyed and did well. As he read the list to the coach, he was directed to reread certain items, and lit up with the Holocaust interviews. The coach asked, can you make a business like that? [16:47] Marc interviewed Kay McManus in Episode 32. Kay was a business professional working for technology companies before she was laid off in 2009. Now she is the CEO of Kay-Kan. Kay says being laid off was what moved her to act. It turned out she was able to serve the managers at her past job as a freelancer. Then she went full-time. 

[20:33] Marc introduces Vicki McCullough of Sequitur Marketing, his guest in Episode 11. Vicki was laid off multiple times, and finally decided to be her own boss. She explains how she started. After she tried the job search route to no success, she started contract work in marketing. Then she told herself, this was the time.

[22:18] Marc had two guests who made multi-step pivots. Elizabeth Rabaey was Marc’s guest on Episode 20. Elizabeth also helps Marc on the mailbag episodes. Elizabeth worked for an environmental engineering company, on air and water permitting. After multiple pivots, she is a marketing professional for a large mining equipment company.

[23:16] Elizabeth networked into a project manager position at a company larger than her first one. Elizabeth got involved in marketing and branding there. After a year, her old company reached out to her for marketing, and she worked for them for three years. 

[29:32] Towards the end of 2016 Elizabeth was looking on job boards, and found a marketing coordinator position for an international company. She went to the company website, applied for the job, and her engineering and marketing backgrounds got her hired very quickly. She works from home, with the possibility of international travel.

[32:06] Marc interviewed Thom Singer in Episode 15. Thom was a business development professional who worked for a law firm until the 2009 recession, when he was laid off. He then launched his career as a keynote speaker and MC. He had already been speaking on the side, but the layoff motivated him to make this his profession.

[32:36] Thom’s background prepared him to train other law firms. But, because of the recession, they stopped hiring outside services. Associations of all kinds still held their meetings, and so keynote speaking became the biggest part of Thom’s business. He was unable to get the rates per speech he needed, and his mortgage didn’t shrink.

[34:30] Thom was losing money. The family went through cash reserves and credit cards. In a few years he caught up to his previous salary, but then had to work off three years of debt. In six and a half years he was at a stable level. A bad quarter still makes him nervous, but then the next quarter is fine.

[35:34] Marc interviewed Mike Martin in Episode 24. Mike spent most of his career in industrial sales, but that career sputtered out. Mike shares his multi-step pivots, from teaching school, to driving trains, to being a drone pilot instructor.

[37:36] Mike got his teaching certification just as massive teacher layoffs hit Texas. So he finished his bachelor’s degree in aviation. He took a job at a small airport, but didn’t like it, so he looked at other transportation, and found an opening as a train operator in Texas. He passed the test, aced the interview, and was sent to train operator school.

[39:30] Mike got an RV, and parked it at an RV resort near the train school. In 10 weeks he had a certificate, and was assigned to wash trains until a route came up. He got an assignment to burn in new trains, with their computer systems. Then he started testing the signal systems on a new route. When the new route opened, he ran the PR train.

[41:37] With the new line open, and new confidence from training operators, he returned home. When he looked around, he saw activity in the drone world, and that’s where he landed. He took 25 hours of training, and started training others to fly, for Dart Drones. He could not have planned his career path, and made corrections on the way.

[44:43] Mike encourages career pivoters to pursue their dreams and never give up. The first avenue might not work out. Work the industry deep and wide.

[45:23] Marc’s final words: Please pick up a copy of Marc’s book, and write an honest review on Amazon.com. He is working on the audio version next. Marc is also working on the Career Pivot Community membership website. Watch for updates in the coming months.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Careerpivot.com

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for the 2nd Half of Life, by Marc Miller and Susan Lahey The paperback and ebook formats are available now. Marc is recording the audio version of the book, and he plans to have it available in September. 

Marc is taking on new clients. Contact Marc, and ask questions at: Careerpivot.com/contact-me or call at 512-693-9132, and leave a message with your email address. Marc will respond with a link to his calendar, to find a time to talk.

Show Notes at Careerpivot.com/repurpose-career-podcast

Dr. Joel Dobbs, Episode 3

Halftime: Moving from Success to Significance, by Bob P. Buford

Mike O’Krent, Episode 7

Jennifer Winter, Episode 28

Kay McManus, Episode 32

Vicki McCullough, Episode 11

Elizabeth Rabaey, Episode 20

Mike Martin, Episode 24

Thom Singer, Episode 15

CareerPivot.com Episode 36

 

Take a moment — go to iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play. Give this podcast a review and subscribe! If you’re not sure how to leave a review, please go to CareerPivot.com/review, and read the detailed instructions there.

Jul 3, 2017

Richard Eisenberg is Marc’s expert guest in this episode. Richard is the Managing Editor for PBS’s Baby Boomer website, NextAvenue.org, a site for people 50-plus, and Editor of the site’s Work & Purpose and Money & Security channels. He previously worked at Money Magazine, Yahoo, Good Housekeeping, and USA Today. He is the author of How to Avoid a Midlife Financial Crisis, and The Money Book of Personal Finance. Richard lives in New Jersey, and will be 61 in July.

Marc and Richard start the discussion with Richard’s career history, how he heard about Next Avenue, how he got involved, and what were the attractors that brought him to work for a virtual company starting in his mid-fifties. Richard comments on some of the issues faced by the fifty-to-seventy demographic, and what Next Avenue is doing to educate and inform about these challenges of mature life. Richard tells of the surprises, mostly pleasant he found at Next Avenue.

 

Listen in to learn about this online resource with great information to improve your life.

Key Takeaways:

[2:43] Richard became a journalist because he is curious. He likes to learn things, and relate them to other people.

[3:06] NextAvenue.org is a website by the public television station of Minneapolis-St. Paul, TPT. Next Avenue was the idea of Jim Pagliarini, TPT President and CEO. Jim researched for seven years how PBS could serve Boomers, as they had served children with Sesame Street. He settled on a website. Richard helped launch it in May, 2012.

[4:50] Richard decides which pieces to publish and when to publish them. He maintains the home page and copy edits all the articles on the site, which includes new content every day. His main job is editing two of the five channels — Money & Security, and Work & Purpose. He also assists with the other three channels.

[6:10] Next Avenue has developed in five years. Based on the economy, there is less concern now over major layoffs and “Will I ever get hired?” The audience has grown, and they give feedback. Partner companies republish some Next Avenue articles.

[7:58] Gen X people are moving into the 50-and-older group, and the site writes now for Boomers and Gen Xers. The content is targeted to people in their 50s and 60s. In the years to come, Richard sees the groups becoming more educated about age-related topics, so Next Avenue will go into more detail beyond the basics in articles.

[9:12] Marc has also pivoted his site to address Gen Xers in the second half of life. Some Boomers are 70-plus, crossing the demographic boundary.

[9:30] Richard was referred to the site as it was launching, and he wanted to be part of a startup, where he could write again. The role and the opportunity were right for him. He had spent his career doing service journalism, and this site was for his own age group.

[11:19] Next Avenue is a virtual operation, headquartered in St. Paul, Minn. There are about nine people who work on the site full-time, in various cities. A lot of the articles are written by freelance writers or by the editors, or are excerpts from books.

[12:24] Next Avenue gets between one and two million visitors a month. This is from five years of publishing. Richard would like more people to know about it, and read the articles.

[13:25] Marc joined the Next Avenue Facebook group in 2011. From there, he met someone who introduced him to Richard. Marc and Richard were in the same graduating class at Northwestern, but never knew each other, in their separate majors.

[14:23] Richard enjoys learning new things every day about his channel areas, and about the other channels, which he might not read if he didn’t work there. He likes to be able to talk to people that are the smartest people in the areas of the site channels, to pick their brains, and also to read the latest research.

[15:16] Richard’s readers are more upbeat, positive, and resilient than he might have expected, even in view of serious challenges of employment and health. They tell how they’ve managed to survive in spite of the challenges. People are hopeful, and willing to do what they need to do.

[17:20] If you have hope, you will likely get through it. The internet is allowing us to learn more, through other people who have gone through these challenges in the past. One of Richard’s big disappointments is with people knowing what to do, but not doing it, such as saving for retirement.

[18:40] The reality is the environmental change isn’t slowing down, it’s speeding up. We need to adapt. It’s a lot harder to do than it sounds. If you’re not preparing yourself for the things that you need, it will be even harder when the time comes, to do something.

[21:06] Marc’s final words: NextAvenue.org is not just a website, it is a community to go to for inspiration. Marc would like you to pick up Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide to the Second half of Life, at Amazon or other online retailers. When you complete reading the book, Marc would appreciate an honest review on Amazon.com.

 

Mentioned in This Episode:

Careerpivot.com/episode-35

Repurpose Your Career: A Practical Guide for the Second Half of Life, by Marc Miller and Susan Lahey (Now available online)

Contact Marc, and ask questions at: Careerpivot.com/contact-me

Call Marc at 512-693-9132 and leave a message and email address.

REisenberg@NextAvenue.org

NextAvenue.org

Twitter: @RichEis315

LinkedIn: Richard Eisenberg

How to Avoid a Mid-Life Financial Crisis, by Richard Eisenberg

The Money Book of Personal Finance, by Richard Eisenberg

 

Please take a moment — go to iTunes, Stitcher, or Google Play. Give this podcast a review and subscribe! If you’re not sure how to leave a review, please go to CareerPivot.com/review, and read the detailed instructions there.

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